About the authors

Mohamed Alansari is a Graduate Teaching and Research Assistant within the School of Learning, Development and Professional Practice at the University of Auckland.

Abdulnasser Alhusaini is a graduate student from the College of Education at the University of Arizona.

Alison Ayr is School Development Facilitator for Learning EnhancementAssociates (NZ) Ltd in the Northland area, based in Kerikeri; currently contracted to deliver the Ministry of Education’s Social Studies Teacher Professional Development Contract. Prior to this Alison was Deputy Principal at Belmont Intermediate School in Auckland.

Donna Beeston is a New Zealand trained teacher who is currently working in an international school in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. After many years of working as a classroom teacher she has recently moved into the field of special needs education and is currently completing her Masters of Education (Special Education) at Massey University.

Jill Bevan-Brown is an Associate Professor in the School of Curriculum and Pedagogy, Massey University College of Education where she has responsibility for the B.Ed (Special Education). Jill’s teaching and research interests centre around learners with special needs and special abilities and Mäori education and research. Her Masterate research involved Mäori perspectives of intellectual disability and giftedness and her doctoral thesis investigated culturally appropriate, effective services for Mäori learners with special needs. Jill’s cultural heritage is Irish, Welsh and Mäori (Ngäti Raukawa, Ngäti Wehiwehi, Ngäti Awa and Ngäi te Rangi). Her teaching experience of 30+ years ranges from early childhood to tertiary both in Aotearoa/New Zealand and overseas.

Megan Biddick lives in Auckland, where she originally trained as a primary teacher. She is currently studying extramurally at Massey University and hopes to graduate this semester with a Bachelor of Education (Special Education). Having spent the past decade as a fulltime carer for her two young sons with autism, Megan is looking forward to returning to the workforce, ideally sharing her experience with both families and schools to help maximise educational opportunities for children with special needs.

Brenda Bicknell is a Senior Lecturer in Maths, Science and Technology Education at the University of Waikato.

Seth Brown is a Lecturer in Health and Physical Education in the School of Education in the College of Design and Social Context at RMIT University.

Phillippa Butler is a Research Officer in the Institute of Education at Massey University.

Lakshmi Chellapan is a recent Masters of Education graduate from the University of Canterbury.

Carmel Diezmann is a lecturer in early childhood at the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane. She is a former primary teacher with a long involvement in the education of young gifted children. She continues her interest in this area through enrichment programmes run through the university. Her particular interests include mathematical reasoning and the role of social interactions in learning.

Kylee Edwards, M.Ed. (First Class Honours), is a Teaching Fellow and PhD student at the University of Waikato, New Zealand. She tutors a gifted paper Developing talent in young people, within the School of Education. Her research interests include; the twice exceptional and gifted tertiary papers.

Sarah Farquhar is Chief Executive at ChildForum Early Childhood Education National Network.

Annaline Flint is a Lecturer within the School of Learning, Development and Professional Practice at the University of Auckland

Deborah Fraser is an Associate Professor in Human Development and Counselling at the University of Waikato.

Eunice Gaerlan-Price is a doctoral candidate at the University of Auckland.

Lynda Garrett is a Senior Lecturer within the School of Learning, Development and Professional Practice at the University of Auckland.

Helen Gray completed her Postgraduate Diploma in Education at Massey University in 1999. She currently works as a primary school relieving teacher in Timaru, when she’s not too busy playihg the roles of homemaker and mother.

Cornelius Holz is a primary school principal who has taught throughout country Queensland from Lockhart River in the north to Winton in the west. He is interested in the problems and management of small schools as well as gifted education. In addition, Mr Holz is a talented musician who plays several instruments, conducts various orchestras on a regular basis as well as writing and arranging for them.

Dr Paul Jewell teaches in the Graduate Certificate of Gifted Education and the Master of Gifted Education offered in New Zealand through the University of Waikato and the Flinders University of South Australia. This co-operative arrangement involves staff of the two universities, providing lectures at Waikato’s Harnilton campus during school holidays. Dr Jewell’s teaching and research focus is in the areas of reasoning and ethics.

Frances A Karnes is Professor of Special Education and Director of the Frances A. Kames Center for Gifted Studies at the University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Frances has published numerous books and articles on the education of gifted children with special interests in leadership development, gifted females, legal issues, public relations, and competitions.

Scott Lee is a Lecturer in the Faculty of Education and Arts at Australian Catholic University in Melbourne.

June Maker is a Professor of Special Education within the College of Education at the University of Arizona

Sharon Mansfield is a Masters of Education graduate of Massey University.

Valerie G Margrain is currently studying for a PhD through Victoria University of Wellington. She is interested in social scaffolding, self-scaffolding and spontaneous learning of young learners, working with a group ofprecocious readers. Valerie completed a Master of Educational Psychology through Massey University in 1999. She has worked as a teacher for 12 years and is a parent to 4 children, the youngest of whom is less than a year. Valerie welcomes contact at 

Associate Professor Don McApine is the Director of Assessment Services, Palmerston North. He serves on the editorial board of APEX® and is Patron of the New Zealand Association for Gifted Children. Don co-authored Gifted and Talented Students: Meeting The Their Needs in New Zealand Schools and serves on the Ministry of Education Advisory Groups on Gifted Education and Website Development.

Lyn McDonald is a Senior Lecturer within the School of Learning, Development and Professional Practice at the University of Auckland.

Roger Moltzen is a Senior Lecturer and Director of Special Education Programmes at the University of Waikato. He is New Zealand delegate to the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children and the Asia-Pacific Federation of the World Council. Roger was a co-editor APEX® : The New Zealand Journal of Gifted Educaution and is a member of the editorial board of TalentED. He co-ordinates the joint University of Waikato and Flinders University of South Australia Graduate Certificate in Gifted Education .

Theresa Monaco is Professor of Curriculum and Instruction and Director for Center for Gifted and Talented Education at the University of Houston. She has authored the Biographical Directory of Leaders in Gifted Education and Evaluation of Programs for Gifted Students.

Timu Niwa is a primary teacher atAwapuni School in Palmerston North. He completed his Bachelor of Education at Massey University in 1998, during which time he developed a particular interest in gifted students.

Randal Pease is a Teacher-Educator within the College of Education at the University of Arizona.

Elizabeth Peterson is a Senior Lecturer within the School of Psychology at the University of Auckland.

Lynette Radue was born in Zimbabawe and now lives in Auckland. She began her career in early childhood after immigrating to New Zealand 14 years ago. She studied for her diploma of teaching and bachelor of teaching in early childhood through New Zealand Tertiary College. She is currently a student in the early childhood postgraduate course at Massey University. She has experience working in a range of early childhood education settings and is currently head teacher at a private kindergarten.

Dr Tracy Riley is a Senior Lecturer in gifted education in the Department of Learning and Teaching at Massey University. She is a member of the Ministry of Education Advisory Groups on Gifted Education and website development. Tracy serves as international advisor for Gifted Child today Magazine and was a long time co-editor of APEX®: The New Zealand Journal of Gifted Education. She teaches undergraduate and postgraduate papers in gifted education at Massey.

Christine Rubie-Davies is a Professor within the School of Learning, Development and Professional Practice at the University of Auckland.

Carola Sampson is a Masters student in Education at Massey University.

Emma Scobie-Jennings is a Masters of Education graduate of Massey University.

Alison M Sewell is a Lecturer in the Department of Learning and Teaching at Massey University. Alison’s primary teaching focus in social studies education, but she has a particular interest in the education of gifted students. Her other research and teaching interests include self-efficacy, educational psychology, learning and cognition, and occasionally computers in education.

Dr Joyce van Tassel-Baska is the Jody and Layton Smith Professor ofEducation at The College of William and Mary in Virginia, US. She is also the Director of the Center for Gifted Education. Joyce recently visited New Zealand as a Fulbright Scholar and enjoyed the people and the land.

Linda Versteynen is a Waikato University student who has just completed her Bachelor of Education with Honours. She has a strong interest in educating gifted and talented primary school children. Linda endeavours to utilise the knowledge gained from her study in gifted education to enhance her teaching in this area.

Janna Wardman is a Lecturer within the School of Learning, Development and Professional Practice at the University of Auckland.

Penelope Watson is a Lecturer within the School of Learning, Development and Professional Practice at the University of Auckland.

Jim Watters is a senior lecturer in science education at the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane. As a former high school teacher he has taught gifted students and continues to work with gifted students in enrichment programmes run through the QUT. His interests include supporting teachers who work with gifted students and researching effective teaching and learning strategies in gifted education. His work has been published in national and international journals.

Debra Wells is currently a student at the University ofWaikato. She is in the final stages of a Masters in Social Science. Her thesis topic is ‘The Imposter Phenomenon – The Need to Please”. Prior to returning to University in 1996 to complete her Bachelor of Education she was a primary school teacher for a number of years. Her interests now lie in the area of adult education and in particular, the experiences of adult students returning to tertiary study. She is also interested in community mental health and is at present writing a course for mental health support workers for Waikato Polytechnic.

Melinda Wong is a doctoral candidate at the University of Canterbury.

Carolyn Yewchuk is Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta, and a Canadian delegate to the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children and Youth. Her research interests include education of gifted children with disabilities, and the lived experiences of eminent women. She serves on the editorial boards ofRoeper Review, The Journal of Secondary Gifted Education, and High Ability Studies, and edits AGATE, The Journal of the Gifted and Talented Education Council of the Alberta Teachers’ Association.

Robert Zimmerman is a Researcher within the College of Education at the University of Arizona.

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